Tasmania Landlord's Rights to Enter Premises

During a tenancy, it may be necessary for the landlord to access the premises. This may be to perform repairs, conduct inspections, or to show the premises to prospective buyers.

This guide covers landlords (or head-tenants) and tenants (or sub-tenants) in a Residential Tenancy. This applies to the majority of share accommodation and residential property rental situations. To confirm it covers your situation visit What is my share accommodation situation?

About the landlord’s entry rights

It is important to remember that during the tenancy, even though the landlord owns the premises, the tenant has been given exclusive occupation. This means that the tenant has the right to generally determine when other people are allowed into the premises. In the case of shared accommodation, this may mean that the tenant has the right to determine who and when other people, including the landlord, can access their room.

The tenant has the right to remain at the property while the landlord enters.

Entry with the tenant’s permission

The best option is always for the landlord and tenant to discuss a mutually convenient time for the landlord to enter the premises.

If however an agreement on time cannot be reached, the landlord can enter without permission according to the rules detailed below.

Entry without the tenant’s permission—notice not required

The landlord can enter the premises without the tenant’s permission and without giving any notice if they reasonably believe that:

  • the tenant is ill or injured meaning they cannot give permission
  • it is necessary to avoid damage to all or part of the premises
  • there is a risk to any person at the premises including the tenant
  • there has been any damage to the premises
  • the premises has been abandoned

Entry without the tenant’s permission—24 hours notice required

The landlord can enter the premises without the tenant’s consent by giving at least 24 hours notice for the following reasons:

  • to fulfil the landlord’s obligations under the tenancy agreement (e.g. perform required maintenance)
  • if the landlord reasonably believes that the tenant has breached the agreement
  • to ensure that repairs have been properly performed
  • to carry out an inspection within a month of the tenancy agreement beginning
  • to carry out a routine inspection (maximum of once every 3 months)

Entry without the tenant’s permission—showing to prospective tenant

The landlord can enter the premises to show it to a prospective tenant under the following conditions.

If the landlord has already given the tenant a notice to terminate or a notice to vacate:

  • a maximum of one inspection per day
  • a maximum of 5 inspections a week
  • the landlord must give at least 48 hours notice
  • the entry must be made between 8am and 6pm

If the landlord has not given a notice to terminate or a notice to vacate:

  • entry must be within 28 days of the end of the agreement (end of a fixed term)
  • a maximum of one inspection per day
  • a maximum of 5 inspections per weeks
  • the landlord must give at least 48 hours notice
  • the entry must be between 8am and 6pm

Entry without the tenant’s consent—showing to prospective buyer

The landlord can enter the premises to show it to a prospective buyer under the following conditions:

  • a maximum of one inspection per day
  • a maximum of 5 inspections per weeks
  • the landlord must give at least 48 hours notice
  • the entry must be between 8am and 6pm

Back to Tasmania Rights and Obligations


These legal guides provide a brief summary and introduction of the laws and regulations affecting share accommodation. They do not cover all cases in all legal jurisdictions and might not apply in your specific share accommodation situation. It is important that you use this information as a guide only and seek independent Legal Advice or consult the Relevant Acts. We do not accept any liability that may arise from the use of this information.