Western Australia Security and Locks

The landlord is responsible for providing and maintaining the security of the premises. Generally, the consent of the other party is needed before the locks can be changed.

This guide covers landlords (or head-tenants) and tenants (or sub-tenants) in a Residential Tenancy. This applies to the majority of share accommodation and residential property rental situations. To confirm it covers your situation visit What is my share accommodation situation?

Who is responsible for security?

The landlord is responsible for providing and maintaining the rented premises in a ‘reasonably secure’ condition. This means that the landlord must hand over the rented premises to the tenant in a secure state, and if notified that it has become insecure, performs maintenance to rectify that problem.

When is the premises ‘reasonably secure’?

For the landlord to meet their obligation of providing and maintaining the premises in a ‘reasonably secure’ condition, they must meet the following requirements:

  • Main Entry Doors—the main entry doors must be fitted with a deadlock OR have a key lockable security screen door complying with Australian standards. This does not apply to balcony doors if the balcony is only accessible from inside the premises.
  • Other External Doors—all other external doors must be fitted with a deadlock or patio bolt lock, OR must have a key lockable security screen door complying with Australian standards. This does not apply to balcony doors if the balcony is only accessible from inside the premises.
  • Exterior Windows—all ground floor windows must be fitted with a lock OR a security window grille complying with Australian standards.
  • External Lights—an electrical light must be fitted on or near the outside of the premises that illuminates the entry to the premises and that can be turned on and off from inside the premises.

For more specific information about Australian security standards for locks, doors, and windows, please visit the WA Department of Commerce page here.

When can the locks be changed?

The landlord or tenant must not be change, remove, or add any security device or lock unless the other party gives consent beforehand. The landlord or tenant must not refuse consent unreasonably. This means that there should be a good, justifiable reason for withholding consent, such as unnecessary cost or damage to the premises. Consent should generally always be given when a change in security is necessary to properly secure the premises.

Back to Western Australia Rights and Obligations during Tenancy


These legal guides provide a brief summary and introduction of the laws and regulations affecting share accommodation. They do not cover all cases in all legal jurisdictions and might not apply in your specific share accommodation situation. It is important that you use this information as a guide only and seek independent Legal Advice or consult the Relevant Acts. We do not accept any liability that may arise from the use of this information.